A brief history of NCSC at Bisley

Bisley Camp has been the home of the National Rifle Association (NRA) and numerous other rifle and clay shooting clubs for over 128 years. This rich and intriguing history has evolved over time with Queen Victoria opening the first annual rifle meeting at Wimbledon back in 1860. She fired the inaugural shot at the first rifle meeting on 2nd July that year and this event is still very much alive in the form of the annual Prize Meeting (the Imperial) which includes the Queen’s Prize.

Bisley Camp itself is an historic location with many fine examples of Colonial style architecture and a plethora of traditional lodge buildings taking the visitor back to a long-gone era. The estate has over 3000 acres with an abundance of natural woodland, which is home to many protected species on a site of special scientific interest.  You may even be lucky enough to see one of the large herd of red deer that currently enjoy sharing the site with us.

Both the National Clay Shooting Centre (NCSC) and Bisley Shooting Ground are now run by the National Shooting Centre (NSC) which is a subsidiary of the National Rifle Association. The two grounds work closely together, utilising the same instructors and sharing facilities, but also tailor their  instruction  to the specific requirements of the client, because we have every discipline available to us. Being able to match the client with the right discipline and the most appropriate instructor is a real benefit.

NCSC was built for the Commonwealth Games in 2002 and is a world-class shooting complex. The instantly recognisable skyline of white canopies cover a line of superb shooting layouts, equipped with over 90 clay release machines catering for shooters of all abilities. They include computer controlled scoring, trap sequencing, acoustic release, and two training layouts. Regular competitions such as CPSA Registered shoots, BICTSF Selection shoots, and NCSC club competitions are held throughout the year.

In 2020 the reception and café were updated as well as investment in the shooting facilities on the ground. For years NCSC has only used black clays for the skeet disciplines as the targets ended up falling in front of the DTL range and orange targets distracted the shooter, but now we have introduced nets so that we can use orange targets for Olympic Skeet and remove the  debris.  Consequently we now have a world-class Olympic Skeet layout which is attracting much interest from the elite shooting community.